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c. To Maximize Effectiveness of PMCS - TM-9-5130-338-12P_15
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TM-9-5130-338-12P Forward Repair System (FRS) Model M7 Manual
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Section III.  OPERATION UNDER USUAL CONDITIONS
TM 9-5130-338-12&P 2-4.  INTRODUCTION TO PMCS TABLE-Continued. 2. Loose.    Damaged,  or  Missing  Bolts,  Nuts,  and  Screws.      Check   for   obvious   looseness   or   damaged condition.    Without  using  a  wrench,  it  may  be  difficult  to  spot  loose  hardware.    However,  you  can  often identify loose bolts by chipped or missing paint around the bolt head and bare metal at the base of the bolt head.    If  you  find  a  loose  bolt,  tighten  it.    If  a  bolt  is  missing,  or  a  damaged  bolt,  nut,  or  screw  is discovered, report it to unit maintenance. 3. Fluid Leaks.  Look for wear, damage, and leaks under fluid hoses, lines, and fittings.  Ensure fittings and clamps are tight.  Wet spots indicate leaks but stains around a fitting can mean a leak too.  If a leak comes from a loose fitting or connector, tighten the connection.  If a hose, fitting, or connector is broken or worn out, report it to unit maintenance. It  is  necessary  for  you  to  know  how  fluid  leakage  affects  your  equipment.    The  following  classification system defines the three types of leaks you may encounter while doing PMCS.  Become familiar with the system so that you can determine the readiness/availability of your hydraulic impact wrench. •    Class I leak-Seepage of fluid (indicated by wetness or discoloration) not great enough to form drops. •    Class II leak-Leakage of fluid great enough to form drops, but not enough to cause drops to drip from the item being checked/inspected. •    Class IlIl leak-Leakage of fluid great enough to form drops that fall from the item being checked/inspected. CAUTION Equipment operation is allowable with minor leakage (class I or class II).  Of course, consideration must be given to fluid capacity  in  item/system  being  checked/inspected.    When  in doubt, notify your supervisor.  When operating with class I or class  II  leaks,  continue  to  check  fluid  levels  as  required  in your PMCS to prevent damage to equipment. Class Ill leaks should be reported to your supervisor or unit maintenance. Table 2-1.  OPERATOR PMCS. LOCATION ITEM TO NOT FULLY ITEM CHECK / MISSION NO. INTERVAL SERVICE PROCEDURE CAPABLE IF: 1 Before Hydraulic impact Inspect hydraulic impact wrench (1) for cracks Cracks or broken wrench or breaks in casting. casting or winch body. During Inspect hydraulic impact wrench (1) for Any class Ill leak. evidence of leakage. 2 Before On/off trigger Check for smooth, unrestricted operation of Trigger will not on/off trigger (2). function. 2-4

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